Posts Tagged ‘Windows 8’

100 Days of Windows 8: a Good Start But Unpredictable Future

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Since the release of Windows 8 in Oct.26, it has been over 100 days. According to Microsoft, it has revealed 60 million Windows 8 license sales for this new operation system by far, which is broadly in line with similar stats around the launch Windows 7. Although the figure doesn’t tell us the whole story, for the Windows 8 upgrade cost is significantly lower than Windows 7 and it’s not clear how many are simply licenses sold to OEMs and businesses that aren’t actively in use.

Tami Reller, Microsoft Chief Marketing Officer and Chief Financial Officer, thinks that Microsoft has had “a really solid start” in the sales of Windows 8. She said that there is still more to do after Windows 8’s three-month milestone, and users’ demand for touch is something Microsoft and its partners will pursue.

As we all know, at the first release of Windows 8, the Windows 8 apps are in serious shortage. For example, when users lost password in spite of the new picture password and PIN code, they may be confused in how to recover Windows 8 password. While not everyone is making apps for the Windows Store, she said that the number of apps available has more than quadrupled since the launch of Windows 8. She also pointed out that the Windows Store allows app builders to use their own commerce engines and keep 100 percent of their in-app sale profits, a subtle jab at Apple’s policy.

However, will the sales of Windows 8 in the future be as promising as s expect? Windows 8 password is said to be stored in plaintext form, which is regarded as the first security hole found in the new system. Meanwhile, a point should be noticed is that the sales of Windows 8 tablets, no matter in which brand, is not satisfactory. Then, how about the attitudes of big PC manufacturers towards the future of Windows 8?

First it was Asus and Acer, then Fujitsu. Now Samsung has added its voice to the growing chorus of PC manufacturers who failed to boost demand for machines running Microsoft’s new Windows 8 operating system.

“The global PC industry is steadily shrinking despite the launch of Windows 8,” said Jun Dong-soo, president of Samsung’s memory chip division, “I think the Windows 8 system is no better than the previous Windows Vista platform.” And Samsung has pulled out of Windows RT in the US and HP says it has no plans to use the operating system on ARM-based chips just yet, describing the Surface as “slow and a little kludgey.”

Though as Reller said, “It’s that flexibility and portability of Windows that gives us a lot of opportunity for the future wherever the market might take us”, obviously, the market response is not as positive as Microsoft expect. It is undoubtedly that Microsoft has made and will continue to make efforts to promote the sales of Windows 8 in different means, say, inspiring the OEMs and offering both tablet and laptop in a single ultraportable package. But, the future of Windows 8 is too early to predict.

More years are needed for enterprises to adopt Windows 8

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Gartner, the largest IT research and advisory firm in the world, says in a report that 90 percent of enterprises will bypass wholesale deployment of Windows 8 at least through 2014.

Though Microsoft makes many changes on this new operation system with the intention of better user experience just like Android, Windows 8 is so different from Windows 7 that to learn about its features will be a nightmare, some experts say. Take Windows 8 password authentication methods as an example, since it has added picture password and PIN code as implementations to text password, users should learn how to create password in Windows 8 and also Windows 8 password reset ways when forget it.

“It’s going to be traumatic, I think, especially if the organization doesn’t have an excellent training program for users.” says Georges Khairallah, a network specialist at the Chino Valley Unified School District in Chino Valley, Calif., who has used Windows 8 for weeks to administer his network.

Enterprises are cautious in adoption of new operation systems. Nowadays, most IT shops are still in the midst to change Windows XP to Windows 7. We can see Windows 7 has now become the most popular OS because of its satisfactory performance. Also, as we all know, support of Windows XP will last till 2014, so still some enterprise insist on the old and reliable operation system. As for Windows 8, only 4% of firms say they have plans to migrate to Windows 8 in the next 12 months.
Another big concern that results to slow adoption of Windows 8 in enterprise is its security performance. For example, Windows 8 has been found the first security danger that its password hints are in stored in registry in plain text. We can predict that there must be many potential security problems in this new OS. In addition, Windows 8 shares many core underpinnings with Windows 7, say, policy management, and there isn’t too much security advantage to Windows 7, the stable and relative safe operation system most widely used by PC users.

In addition, in order to use Windows 8 with full functionality, it is necessary for enterprises to make use of touch screen monitors. It is obviously not well suitable to be used by enterprise desktops and won’t improve the productivity of workers who are used to using traditional desktops. What’s more, the expense for it is not cheap. For some small or middle enterprise, it doesn’t worth consideration at all.

The upgrade price of Windows 8 has been raised since this month with the end of Microsoft’s sales promotion. It will also make some influence to the sales Windows 8 in the short term.

What’s the fate of Windows 8, the milestone of Microsoft’s operation system? It is too early to predict. However, at least, in the near future, it must be a long process to be adopted by enterprises.

Why Windows 8 Tablets Encounters Bottlenecks? Because of Windows 8 Password?

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

On October 25, Microsoft officially released the new operating system, Windows 8 and announced the information of Surface tablet, a kind of new tablet based on Windows 8. The release of Windows 8 is different from other operating systems, for it is not only a normal renewal of desktop PC system, but also a mark that tablet PC is about to enter a new era. It’s thin and lightweight, comes with a keyboard cover for better typing, allows you to run the traditional Windows desktop. We can also see many other front-line brands have also launched a variety of Windows 8 tablets, such as Dell, in the following days.

Nevertheless, despite its merits, we have to admit that the sale of Windows 8 tablets around the world is not optimistic at all. As for the reasons, it has been heatedly discussed recently. Some insist that it is due to the flaws in Windows 8 itself, compared to Android and iOS, for example, the new form of password in Windows 8—Picture Password, which is so difficult to remember the gestures and makes users have to deal with Windows 8 password reset frequently. But still others take more factors in Windows 8 tablets into consideration as follows.

A main constraint for Windows 8 tablets’ popularity may lie in their relatively high price, I suppose. Insiders say that a 10-inch Windows 8 tablet PC from first-line brand manufacturers is mostly valued as at least $685. However, the price of a 10-inch Android tablet with NVIDIA Tegra 3 quad-core processors is mostly $275 to $412. We can see that the price gap is quite considerable. Is it worth to pay $799 for a Windows 8 tablet with an Atom processor? Besides, Asus, a mid-range computer vendor, needs $599 for a Windows RT tablet with NVIDIA Tegra ARM? If you want a keyboard for either one, that’s to say, it will cost you an extra $199. Nowadays, consumers look for the best values for what they spend, rather than the latest goods with less value.

On the other hand, although the quantity of software in Windows 8 platform has been developed greatly than that at the beginning of its release, it is still far behind the quantities of Android and iOS software. Besides, Windows RT, a new member of Windows 8, suffers the same problem Windows Phone does, that is, it can only choose very few applications. Due to Windows RT operation system is incompatible with traditional Windows software, consumers’ interest to buy this kind of tablet PC will reduce to a large extent. At the same time, Windows RT won’t let users install programs from any other source but the Windows Store. That’s to say, all you have is the limited selection of tablet apps in the Store.

All in all, the development of Windows 8 tablets is a little disappointed. However, facing this embarrassment, what will Microsoft and other computer companies do? Is there any improvement? We’re looking forward it!